Physical Sciences

Currently Invested Projects

Name
Stage
Weaver
Triage
Weaver is a novel 3D printer that integrates state-of-the-art computational design with advanced long-fibre composite materials. Through its innovative print process and material optimisation software, Weaver 3D will enable direct manufacture of products with unparalleled performance to cost.

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

Sense Muscle
Triage
The AUT research team is developing a wearable sensor to measure strength and motion of
training muscle across fitness exercises such as weightlifting, sport training, powerlifting and
bodybuilding. The sensor will record the full range of contraction and relaxation of a specific
muscle, helping the user to reach their desired fitness goals by detecting incorrect exercise
movement to avoid muscle injury, improve performance and the development of muscle mass. It
will track and analyse muscle training progress for athletic body in realtime
for all forms of
exercises.

Contact: Wilson Huang, wilson.huang@aut.ac.nz

Pinching-free Hold Down for Timber Shear Walls
3
The novel hold-down joint design provides a cost-effective shear wall connection system for use in building construction that prevents pinching and the resultant compromise in structural integrity caused by current hold down joints during a seismic event.  This allows the structure to be re-occupiable with minimal remediation.                

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

Development of an Open Source Laser Doppler Vibrometer (Laser Vibrometer)
2
Utilising laser power to determine the properties of materials such as the ripeness of fruit or the quality of timber no destructively, in-line and in real time.      

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

3d Free Form Printing of Multiple Polymer
1

Truly functional materials can be printed together in free form, without need for baths, support structures or curing, allowing the advancement of 3D printing from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacture of products that can move and sense. For example, novel conductive and stretch sensitive materials will soon allow printing of functional robot ‘muscles’.     

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

Tectonus - Resilient Slip-Friction Joint (RSF) as an innovative structural connection system for seismic damage avoidance
3

The novel slip joint design provides a cost-effective, damage free, structural connection system for use in building construction that dissipates earthquake energy and allows the structure to be re-occupiable with minimum damage and residual drift.

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

Mass Spectrometer- Portable dynamic time-of-flight
2
A novel time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on UniServices patented technology which promises differentiating performance for analysis of high masses, particularly suited for the growing field of proteomics.

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

Optrode
2
An all-fibre spectroscopic fluorescence bacterial detection system that requires minimal manual intervention, and can give accurate results on site within 30 minutes. Results can show a quantification of bacterial load among other things

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

Fire-retardant Polypropylene
2
A non-halogenated fire retardant polypropylene (NH-FRPP) developed through an innovative new process to obtain UL 94-V-0 fire rating without any detrimental effect on mechanical properties.

Contact: Stephen Flint, s.flint@auckland.ac.nz

Cellular Ribbon Communication System
1

Performance degradation of communications systems is a major issue. The more users the slower the performance. The technology developed at the University of Auckland provides novel communications technology provides a high speed, secure, non-contact, invisible (to antenna/traditional RF comms) communications system that overcomes issues with high user loads impairing performance.

Contact: Stephen Flint, +64 21 240 3076, +64 9 923 4898

Gait Analysis-Wireless Inertial
2

Researchers from Auckland Bioengineering Institute have developed a novel wireless motion capture system based on a dynamic model. This wireless motion capture system uses a dynamic model to constrain the drift due to integration. The use of a model with the sensor measurements will lead to a motion capture system whose accuracy is comparable to optical systems at a fraction of the cost.

Contact: Stephen Flint, +64 21 240 3076, +64 9 923 4898

Shell Heat Exchanger
3

Researchers at the Light Metals Research Centre at the University of Auckland have develped air based heat exchanger units that are custom designed to fit any cell in aluminium smelters and enable control of the air flow through the exchangers, thus enabling control of the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the shell wall. This enables flexible operations where the amperage can be increased and decreased beyond design limits for extended periods of time (months). This allows smelters to dynamically control operations based on market conditions.

Contact: Stephen Flint, +64 21 240 3076, +64 9 923 4898